Andre's Blog
Perfection is when there is nothing left to take away
From ASP.Net to Node.js

I originally wrote this blogs application in 2008 in ASP/JScript, thinking that JavaScript-like language would age better than VBScript, but soon realized that while that might be true for the language, the classic ASP itself didn't have a lot of life left in it. This prompted me to rewrite the blogs in ASP.Net/JScript, in 2009. This time I thought my choice of the framework was quite clever and would surely outlast my needs for a blog.

ASP.Net indeed has done remarkably well since 2009, but JScript didn't do nearly as well and Microsoft quietly dropped it from the platform at some point, so my choice of JavaScript as the server side language for my blogs needed another revision. Needless to say, Node.js was really the only choice to consider, so it was an easy decision.

Version? What's that?

Traditional applications rely on the application version to communicate to application users the set of features included in a package and the impact of upgrading from one version to another for applications with carefully maintained versions.

Website applications, on the other hand, are often upgraded by the website operator in their own environments and website users usually have no idea what version of the application is running behind the website UI, even if there is one.

Website applications are centered around user-visible features, which are being continuously developed and deployed to production environments, so grouping features into version levels for such deployments makes very little sense.

Looking for thoughts on HTML reports

HTML reports generated by Stone Steps Webalizer didn't change much structurally since I forked the original project back in 2004. Current HTML reports use CSS styles wherever possible and have some JavaScript niceties, such as rendering charts in JavaScript and, less-known, jumping between reports with Ctrl-Alt-Up/Down, but otherwise they remain the same monthly one-page reports with pre-formatted all-items sub-reports and a single collective index report.