Andre's Blog
Perfection is when there is nothing left to take away
reMarkable, to a point

Pen and paper were always by favorite tools for technical designs and for capturing ongoing work notes and I used to buy blue grid paper notebooks in packs of five, to save me a trip to Staples. I even developed a system to cross reference pages to link notes made at different times.

With all those paper notebooks lying around, whenever new note taking technologies emerged, I rushed to try them out and it worked out well enough for me in that I didn't buy a paper notebook in years. Mostly because OneNote covers majority of note taking needs now and partly because some of those new technologies make taking notes as easy as pulling a paper notebook out of the desk drawer.

A reMarkable tablet is a good example of the latter.

OneNote, too many cooks

I always favored pen and paper for initial technical designs and when first devices that enabled handwriting recognition emerged, I enthusiastically tried them out. Some of those original applications were quite good, but worked only on one device, like the Samsung's SNote, and some worked on several platforms, but captured only pixel images instead of pen strokes.

Eventually, I ended up using OneNote, which works on many devices and has all the features I need, but many of those features are implemented inconsistently across various devices and I can't help but wonder if OneNote is being developed by multiple independent teams with limited communication channels between them.

File Integrity Tracker (fit)

Last month I ended up copying thousands upon thousands of files, while recovering my data from ReFS volumes turned RAW, because Microsoft quietly dropped support for ReFS v1.2 on Windows 10. During file recovery, I was trying to be careful and flushed the volume cache after every significant copy operation, but a couple of times Windows just restarted on its own and I faced a bit of uncertainty on whether data in all files safely reached the drive platters or not.

I used a couple of file integrity verification tools in the past and thought it would take some time to read all files, but otherwise would be a fairly simple exercise. However, it turns out that everyday file tools don't work quite as well against a couple of hundred thousand of files.

Resilient, until it's not

I have been a big proponent of Storage Spaces in Windows 10 for many years and while redundant storage provided by Storage Spaces is not a replacement for a proper backup, it does provide good protection against individual drive failures and some forms of enclosure failures.

When Windows 10 was just released, in addition to drive redundancy, it also allowed formatting Storage Space volumes as ReFS (Resilient File System), which added a layer of protection against bit rot and sudden power loss because of the way it performs disk writes. Later on, Microsoft removed the ability to format new volumes as ReFS from Windows 10, but existing ReFS volumes remained usable and I assumed that Microsoft will be respectful of terabytes of data and will warn me that ReFS will no longer be maintained on Windows 10 when the time comes.

That turned out to be a bad assumption and what followed felt like a gut punch.

From TinyMCE to CKeditor and back

When I wrote the first version of this blogs application in 2008, I initially used TinyMCE for posts and comments, but within a couple of weeks I switched to CKeditor because it handled HTML better and provided server-side support for image uploads. Years have passed since then and the last version of CKeditor I integrated into this application was v2.6, which was written so extraordinarily well, that it continued working for me without any problems for over 10 years.

In the last couple of years, when I started noticing little problems, like Ctrl-B switching back to plain text on its own in Chrome, I decided it was time to upgrade the editor to the latest version. CKeditor worked so well for me over the years that the thought of checking out alternatives didn't even enter my mind.

Windows 11 - Twice as pretty, half as bright

Last week, after a large Windows update, my laptop popped up an offer to upgrade to Windows 11 before even getting to the sign-in screen. There was only upgrade and decline buttons and while I didn't want to update right at that moment, I didn't want to decline either. I pressed Esc and it continued. No idea if it was the same as decline, but checking Settings > Windows Update confirmed that the offer is still there.

I looked around for Windows 11 upgrade stories and couldn't find anything useful - all articles and posts described the new Windows 11 look and feel and had very little to say about features and general behavior. So, I decided to upgrade on the weekend and check it out for myself.